Avigrain birdseed mixes provide the seed component of a balanced avian diet. In the wild birds eat a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, flowers, plants, nectar, grains, roots & tubers, nuts, grubs, animal matter such as insects and carrion, grit and even clay.  A pure seed diet will be relatively high in fat and low in nutrients particularly Vitamin A and calcium.  Seed is a vital part of a balanced avian diet but should not be the only part.  Although ‘complete’ diets such as pellets or fortified seed diets claim to provide a balanced diet they give bird-keepers a false sense of security and do not replicate natural conditions or nutritional inputs.  Also, while little is known about how the mind of a bird works, bird-fanciers will agree they are intelligent creatures and a monotonous pellet or seed diet will bore them.  A varied diet provides mental stimulation for caged and aviary birds.

Avigrain advocates a varied balanced diet thoughtfully provided by well-informed bird-keepers.

Diet Suggestions

  • A clean water supply is a must
  • Bird-keepers must try a wide range of fruits and vegetables to see what their birds like.  Fruit and vegetables provide nutrients not present in seed particularly Vitamin A.  Just about any fruit or vegetable can be tried except Avocado which is toxic to birds.  Iceberg lettuce may cause diarrhoea.
  • Native gum nuts, pine cones, eucalypt branches and blossoms will all be welcomed.
  • Grits and cuttlebone are essential to supplement the diet.  Soluble grits such as egg shell, cuttlebone and charcoal provide minerals and trace elements such as calcium.  Insoluble grits and idgestion as birds have not teeth and grind food into a pulp in their gizzard with the help of grits.  Without grits birds may pass seed straight through thereby losing nutritional input.
  • Egg and Biscuit mix can be fed as well as meal worms or insects for protein.
  • Sprouted speed provides a highly nutritious and tasty source of food.  Sprouting can be time-consuming but bird-keepers should learn which seeds are suitable for their birds and the techniques required to sprout seeds.
  • Worming every three or four months is important and vitamin and mineral supplements are suggested.

Diet suggestions for bird fanciers and breeders

The following diet tips are general and are to be used as a guide to learn more about their birds and the avian diet. For more detailed information on avian diet and general care, breeders should contact their local Avian vet or a specialist publication.

A wide range of fruits and vegetables to see what their birds like. Fruit and vegetables provide nutrients not present in seed particularly Vitamin A. Just about any fruit or vegetable can be tried except Avocado which is toxic to birds. Iceberg lettuce may cause diarrhoea and thistles are excellent except when in flower and the purple leaves are toxic.

Native gum nuts, pine cones, eucalypt branches and blossoms will all be welcomed.

Grits and cuttlebone are essential to supplement the diet. Soluble grits such as egg shell, cuttlebone and charcoal provide minerals and trace elements such as calcium. Insoluble grits aid digestion as birds have no teeth and grind food into a pulp in their gizzard with the help of grits. Without grits birds may pass seed straight through thereby losing nutritional input.

Biscuits or Egg & Biscuit mix can be fed as well as meal worms or insects. Cockatoos will even enjoy cooked meat bones.

The importance of clean water supply.

Sprouted seed provides a highly nutritious and tasty source of food. Sprouting can be time-consuming but breeders should be encouraged to learn which seeds are suitable for their birds and the techniques required to sprout seeds.

Changing a birds diet will upset its routine and should be undertaken carefully. It is important to note a bird’s previous diet when buying or selling birds. Birds fed on pellets will not readily take on a seed diet or vice versa. This may cause problems in a bird shop which will not want to feed two separate diets to its stock. Similarly note whether a lorikeet has been fed on a wet or a dry food.

Worming every three or four months is considered important and vitamin and mineral supplements may also be suggested.